Apple Apps enterprise ready?

Apple announced new features for their messaging platform. While all of us can enjoy editing and unending the messages and complain that Twitter can’t get a simple editing feature; there is something else that no one has mentioned yet.

Even Apple Mail now boasts about Unsend Mail, Schedule Mail and a better search.

With these simple features, Apple Messages, FaceTime and Mail apps are now set up for enterprise use. If you use Apple Gear across your organization (or maybe a higher percentage of users have Apple), you are now looking at using these apps to replace Teams or Zoom as your communication platform.

Moving away from 1Password

I have been using 1Password for a very long time. However, for the past year or more, I have come to rely on Safari (on macOS, iOS and iPadOS) to suggest me strong passwords, storing them for me and ultimately, me making a manual copy/paste to 1Password.

Last month, I turned off my auto-renew on 1Password thinking it gives me 6 months to transition over. I have been using 1Password for Username/Passwords and URL and Backup codes. I have never used 1Password to sore my credit card information. In fact, I was a late adopter of that and just waited until ApplePay came out. I now have one credit card info stored in my Safari for those websites that still don’t accept ApplePay.

Exporting data from 1Password and importing them into Passwords (or iCloud Keychain) was easy – but of course there are a few curve balls. There are two things you need to ensure

  1. Make sure all your passwords in 1Passwords have a URL (better if they are valid URL’s)
  2. iCloud Keychain does not like quotation marks (”); this is something you will need handle them

But once you are ready, you can export your passwords form 1Password by selecting the vault and then navigating to File > Export > All Items...

1Password will ask for your Master Password. And before hitting the done button make sure you change the file format to “iCloud Keychain (.csv)”.

Now, remember those quotation marks? You can now edit the csv file and look for them and reset those passwords – yup thats a manual process. I had a few, so I logged into to those applications, changed my password and let Safari handle them for me. Once this was done, I went and deleted those entries in the csv file.

Now import the CSV file into iCloud Keychain from System Preferences -> Passwords. Hit the three dots at the bottom of the window and select “Import Passwords…” and select your csv file.

An important step after you do this, is to disable 1Password extension on your Safari browser on all your devices. This will help you focus on using Passwords. On your macOS, you can simply type “Passwords” in your spotlight search and it will bring up the Passwords manager. I wish Apple makes these things consistent and bring them on iOS and iPadOS too.

The best part of the transition was that I have probably opened 1Password once. The transition has been super smooth.

Now I hope there is something for 2FA as well.

Weekly Digest 03/25

Apple developing new 15-inch MacBook Air that could come in 2023:

According to DSCC supply chain information, Apple is planning a new variant of the MacBook Air for 2023 that will feature a screen size of around 15-inches. The company is also reportedly planning to increase the display of the current 13.3-inch MacBook Air to something that is “slightly larger” but still between 13-inches and 14-inches.

💻

Considering the new MacBook Pros with the notch and the thin bezels, I think the new MacBook Air probably may come in 13″ & 15″ or 14″ & 16″. My bet is on the latter. This is a good move by Apple.

During the pandemic, my son was force to be virtual in 2nd grade and he was using a MacBook Air. The screen size although decent, for him it always felt not enough. Making a larger screen would be perfect for school.

And of course I’m looking for more colorful MacBook Air’s these things are begging to be personalized.


An Introduction to Generics:

Generics are a big new language feature in 1.18. These new language changes required a large amount of new code that has not had significant testing in production settings. That will only happen as more people write and use generic code. We believe that this feature is well implemented and high quality. However, unlike most aspects of Go, we can’t back up that belief with real world experience. Therefore, while we encourage the use of generics where it makes sense, please use appropriate caution when deploying generic code in production.

That caution aside, we’re excited to have generics available, and we hope that they will make Go programmers more productive.

👨🏻‍💻

I like this blog post. Great explanation of a new programming feature and ending it with an honest request to the community to use generics to help make it better over time.


The Four Innovation Phases of Netflix’s Trillions Scale Real-time Data Infrastructure:

My name is Zhenzhong Xu. I joined Netflix in 2015 as a founding engineer on the Real-time Data Infrastructure team and later led the Stream Processing Engines team. I developed an interest in real-time data in the early 2010s, and ever since believe there is much value yet to be uncovered.

📺

This was one of those articles that I shared after reading a few paragraphs. Zhenzhong talk about the four phases of real-time data infrastructure’s journey in Netflix. I enjoyed reading this cause every time Netflix had a business motivation they had unique challenges on the way, the bets they played and the learnings they had along the way have clearly shaped Netflix to what they are today.


TUIC:

TUIC was designed on the basis of the QUIC protocol from the very beginning. It can make full use of the advantages brought by QUIC. You can find more information about the TUIC protocol here.

👨🏻‍💻

This is pretty cool. Something to play with for the weekend 🙂


Excited about this:

The secret of the macOS Monterey network quality tool

Dan Petrov found a cool new utility:

It seems that Apple has quietly added a new tool in macOS Monterey for measuring your device’s Internet connectivity quality. You can simply call the executable networkQuality, which executes the following tests:

– Upload/download capacity (your Tx/Rx bandwidth essentially)
– Upload/download flows, this seems to be the number of test packets used for the responsiveness tests
– Upload/download responsiveness measured in Roundtrips Per Minute (RPM), which according to Apple, is the number of sequential round-trips, or transactions, a network can do in one minute under normal working conditions

The capacity is roughly the same metric you could expect from tools like Fast.com from Netflix, or OOkla’s Speedtest.

Go to your terminal on your MacBook running macOS Monterey and type in networkQuality and hit enter and viola:

➜ ~ networkQuality
==== SUMMARY ====
Upload capacity: 1.136 Mbps
Download capacity: 204.729 Mbps
Upload flows: 16
Download flows: 12
Responsiveness: Medium (544 RPM)

iPad Pro gets a trackpad

iPad Pro was announced this week with a load of Hardware goodness.
But what got the most attention was that iPad Pro now has a trackpad. Well, the Magic keyboard did (not the iPad) and the iPad OS was updated to support the trackpad.

You can always get the regular Magic Keyboard too.

Steve Sinofsky on the iPad Pro getting a trackpad:

2/ Hardware evolves just like software but we don’t often see it the same way. We’re used to talking about the cycle software bundling and unbundling, but hardware does the same thing. Every new generation of hardware begins this cycle anew.

Users change, they way the interact and interface with a piece of hardware also changes over time. What apple is doing great here is that they are keeping the medium intact for users who want it to work the way it should as well as introducing changes for new users and their behaviors.

And why is a trackpad so important to some users – give a listen to this episode on The Talk Show with John Gruber and Federico Viticci.

And after all of that, just head to apple.com and watch the video and look at the beautiful piece of hardware(s).

Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference 2020 kicks off in June with an all-new online format

Apple Newsroom:

“We are delivering WWDC 2020 this June in an innovative way to millions of developers around the world, bringing the entire developer community together with a new experience,” said Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing. “The current health situation has required that we create a new WWDC 2020 format that delivers a full program with an online keynote and sessions, offering a great learning experience for our entire developer community, all around the world. We will be sharing all of the details in the weeks ahead.”

With Microsoft, Google and Facebook cancelling their keynote (main) events this year; everyone were speculating if Apple will follow suit.

Classic Apple way to announce this; not a cancellation of the conference but an all-new online format accessible to ALL developers – the show much go on.

Apple prepares for the keynote events for months and WWDC is a beat amongst all; they may not have the hassle of managing crowds but making this accessible online when WWDC kicks off requires a whole set of challenges. Monitoring the performance of the even before and during the event will be key.

What I liked about this announcement was the fact that there was no mention of “coronavirus” or “COVID-19”.