Killing a feature is also important

When it comes to adding a feature to your product, there are countless ways of doing this – and we still mess it up. However, when it comes to killing a feature there isn’t much out there.

As product managers we get excited to take the product to the next level with new features. But deep inside we know there are some features in your product that simply don’t work anymore. You are tracking your product with countless KPIs and metrics to see the health of your product, and its right on the dashboard when a feature isn’t getting clicks or for that matter appreciation (feedback). We either ignore them or simply stop tracking them.

Features that don’t work cost money to support. Worst, just by being present in the product they complicate workflows and risk distracting your users from their core tasks.


You may have heard your customers complain at times: “Your product is to complicated or bulky”. There is a high likely hood that there are features sitting in your product that isn’t being used that’s adding to this bulk and complexity.


Removing a feature isn’t simple. You can’t simply release a new version without a feature. You have to treat removing a feature the same way as adding a new feature to the product:

  • does the existing feature align with your overall product vision & strategy.
  • deprecating a feature needs user search, interviews and analysis.
  • deprecating a feature needs planning, included in the roadmap, and communicate with your users.

To decide if a feature needs to be deprecated:

  • check with your users what are they using to solve their problems instead of your feature.
  • did the feature miss the market?
  • the feature may solve a user problem but its unsustainable for you.
  • the feature solves a problem for a very small set of users, but its not a problem worth solving for you.

When deprecating a feature, communication and transparency is key. Ensure you have two set paths, i.e. End of Life (EoL) and End of Support (EoS) and there is sufficient time for the users (if any) to move to other options if they are using this feature.

To ensure a successful EoL and EoS,

  • remove the feature so that new users do not have access to this
  • de-emphasize the feature in the UI – out of sight out of mind.
  • suggest alternatives and help your users migrate

Lastly, make sure this is part of your continuous onboarding strategy, where you are communicating this to your users and helping them migrate through the EoL and EoS timeframe.

Things to read for Week 44

Github gets a new CEO

GitHub CEO Nat Friedman is stepping down from his role on November 15 to become the Chairman Emeritus of the Microsoft-owned service. Thomas Dohmke, who only recently became GitHub’s chief product officer, will step into the CEO role.

Great to see a product person stepping into the shoes of a CEO.


Tesla is letting non-Tesla EVs use its Supercharger network for the first time

Tesla’s Supercharger network is often held up as the best possible example of an EV charging network: fast, reliable, and plentiful. But Tesla’s network is also exclusive to Tesla owners, meaning someone driving a Volkswagen or Ford EV wouldn’t be able to use it. But that’s now starting to change.

So how long until we start hearing about standardized car chargers?


How to design a good API and why it matters:

If you find yourself in charge of building an API for your application and need a good reference, this is a great start.


Toxiproxy

Toxiproxy is a framework for simulating network conditions. It’s made specifically to work in testing, CI and development environments, supporting deterministic tampering with connections, but with support for randomized chaos and customization.

This is a good library to have in your arsenal whether you are an Engineer, PM or QA. Testing on different network conditions is important.


Why you should develop a UX roadmap:

Thinking ahead to next quarter, consider collaborating with your fellow designers, researchers, and content strategists to develop a UX roadmap. This will prompt you to review potential work against user and business goals and prioritize the most important items. From there, you can share your draft with key stakeholders and see if they agree. Developing and refining this roadmap will help you become more strategic and focused, while helping you develop your collective perspective and voice.

Its not easy to change the culture of how things are built. It’s hard but its important to start doing this.


6 things a Product Manager is not:

4. A product manager isn’t an agile fascist

Agile and lean are all-the-rage and de rigueur in modern software development. The next statement will probably be an unfashionable one but agile isn’t the only way to build web products and waterfall isn’t evil. Product managers shouldn’t be wedded to cult agile.

This made me chuckle. Good read.


First companies and now cities battling for top talent. Good times.


Prioritize health over work. It’s important.

Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference 2020 kicks off in June with an all-new online format

Apple Newsroom:

“We are delivering WWDC 2020 this June in an innovative way to millions of developers around the world, bringing the entire developer community together with a new experience,” said Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing. “The current health situation has required that we create a new WWDC 2020 format that delivers a full program with an online keynote and sessions, offering a great learning experience for our entire developer community, all around the world. We will be sharing all of the details in the weeks ahead.”

With Microsoft, Google and Facebook cancelling their keynote (main) events this year; everyone were speculating if Apple will follow suit.

Classic Apple way to announce this; not a cancellation of the conference but an all-new online format accessible to ALL developers – the show much go on.

Apple prepares for the keynote events for months and WWDC is a beat amongst all; they may not have the hassle of managing crowds but making this accessible online when WWDC kicks off requires a whole set of challenges. Monitoring the performance of the even before and during the event will be key.

What I liked about this announcement was the fact that there was no mention of “coronavirus” or “COVID-19”.

Moment Lens – The saga behind buying one.

I have been toying around the idea of getting one of those snap on lenses for my iPhone for a while now. I use my phone for photography a lot and you can see my snaps on Instagram and some of them on Flickr. 

One of the things I have always missed while clicking on iPhone is that extra bit of zoom. The digital zoom absolutely destroys the picture and you don’t not want to use that. I did some research and came across a few snap on zoom lenses for the iPhone, of which Moment Lens and Olloclip. Both of these are great products. While Olloclip is endorsed by a few photographers I know; Austin Mann is one of them.  

So, before I put any money in them, I wanted to see if I could try these out. A friend lend me his Olloclip lens and the performance was good.

The Olloclip is a 4-in-1 system that has 4 lenses – a fisheye, wide angle, 10x macro and a 15x macro. Olloclip is like a snap on lens that you clip it on your iPhone and remove it when you don’t want them. The two lenses that are fish eye and wide angle; you flip them and they become macro lenses. The same way you would reverse a lens on any DSLR camera to make it a macro lens. These are great lenses, however I’m not a big fan of the fish eye, and the iPhones current lens is wide enough to take great pictures (there is always panorama mode). I was intrigued with macro, but somehow I wasn’t impressed with what I clicked.

I tried the Moment lens as well and I was impressed with its performance.  With moment lens it’s a different story. To use these lenses you have to glue its sense holder on to your phone around the camera (they are well designed and don’t look ugly) which allows the moment lens to snap on, much like those DSLR cameras and that’s where the quality and sharpness is amazing. So if you are not serious about these lenses, or you like the aesthetics of your phone; you probably should not be investing in moment lenses. 

Both these products are really great, however the Moment Lens impressed me the most. It takes a while for you to get used to attaching that lens to your phone but once you get the knack of it its easy. Every product has a learning curve, this one its not that long.

No doubt the product is great. But you need to have the same experience when you are selling one. 

I was going on a vacation in about 5 days time and I wanted to make sure I got the lens before Friday evening. For the time being the express shipping option was disabled on their site since they were working with the shipping guys to make sure everything is in place.  

I sent a mail to the team at Moment Lens in Seattle and I got a reply in about 20 minutes with a solution. The team at Moment Lens came back to me saying I could place my order and then call them on a number with my order number and they would ship it to me using FedEx and they would charge me the shipping cost. Not a problem. I was all set to place my order, however my gut feeling was no. So, I borrow my friends lens for my upcoming vacation and place the order once I’m back. 

I place my order for my lens on April 10. Immediately I get a confirmation mail with my order number and an invoice. Since I wasn’t in a hurry now I was ok with their 10 day shipping option. Three days later I get an email that my order has been shipped and something in that email confirmation caught my eye. 

Your Order has been shipped via HongKong POST.
Tracking #XXXXXXXXXXXXX
Click HERE to track your shipment.

Why is my lens being shipped by HongKong POST and where the heck is this coming from? Not that it surprised me that the lens was manufactured and assembled in China (of course), but what surprised me was it was also being shipped from there and not from Seattle. In any case as long as it gets shipped and delivered to me in 10 days I was ok.

When I tried to track my shipment, all it said was “Destination – United States of America”. I waited for a week and mailed the team at Moment Lens and sure enough within a few hours I got an email apologizing for the delay and finally the status on shipment had changed. Now it said:

Destination – United States of America
The item (XXXXXXXXXXXX) left Hong Kong for its destination on 20-Apr-2015

That was great, finally it was shipped after 10 days of me placing this order. I wait.  I wait for another week and yet again Is end another email to the team at Moment Lens on April 27 talking to them about my frustration and the fact that it was supposed to be shipped in 10 days. And there it was in a hours time I had a response with an apology and this time with a link to USPS where I could track the progress of my shipment now that it was shipped to the United States.

I’m not sure if I should consider this to be helpful or not. However this was the status on April 27 and it remains to be the same status on May 1. If you have a great product, make sure you give a great service. At this point in time I’m looking for options on Moment Lens website to see how do I go about canceling my order. 

And the worst; after talking to Moment Lens about my frustration I get an email form them:

There is a certain threshold when even the most patient person would loose it. When this post makes it way to twitter and other social network sites; I won’t be surprised to receive an explanation on the delay or the fact that it does take such a looooooong time to ship something out. It doesn’t matter; my experience buying this product wasn’t great and it does not motivate me at all to go ahead and use it and enjoy my post buying experience.