The secret of the macOS Monterey network quality tool

Dan Petrov found a cool new utility:

It seems that Apple has quietly added a new tool in macOS Monterey for measuring your device’s Internet connectivity quality. You can simply call the executable networkQuality, which executes the following tests:

– Upload/download capacity (your Tx/Rx bandwidth essentially)
– Upload/download flows, this seems to be the number of test packets used for the responsiveness tests
– Upload/download responsiveness measured in Roundtrips Per Minute (RPM), which according to Apple, is the number of sequential round-trips, or transactions, a network can do in one minute under normal working conditions

The capacity is roughly the same metric you could expect from tools like Fast.com from Netflix, or OOkla’s Speedtest.

Go to your terminal on your MacBook running macOS Monterey and type in networkQuality and hit enter and viola:

➜ ~ networkQuality
==== SUMMARY ====
Upload capacity: 1.136 Mbps
Download capacity: 204.729 Mbps
Upload flows: 16
Download flows: 12
Responsiveness: Medium (544 RPM)

Things to read for Week 44

Github gets a new CEO

GitHub CEO Nat Friedman is stepping down from his role on November 15 to become the Chairman Emeritus of the Microsoft-owned service. Thomas Dohmke, who only recently became GitHub’s chief product officer, will step into the CEO role.

Great to see a product person stepping into the shoes of a CEO.


Tesla is letting non-Tesla EVs use its Supercharger network for the first time

Tesla’s Supercharger network is often held up as the best possible example of an EV charging network: fast, reliable, and plentiful. But Tesla’s network is also exclusive to Tesla owners, meaning someone driving a Volkswagen or Ford EV wouldn’t be able to use it. But that’s now starting to change.

So how long until we start hearing about standardized car chargers?


How to design a good API and why it matters:

If you find yourself in charge of building an API for your application and need a good reference, this is a great start.


Toxiproxy

Toxiproxy is a framework for simulating network conditions. It’s made specifically to work in testing, CI and development environments, supporting deterministic tampering with connections, but with support for randomized chaos and customization.

This is a good library to have in your arsenal whether you are an Engineer, PM or QA. Testing on different network conditions is important.


Why you should develop a UX roadmap:

Thinking ahead to next quarter, consider collaborating with your fellow designers, researchers, and content strategists to develop a UX roadmap. This will prompt you to review potential work against user and business goals and prioritize the most important items. From there, you can share your draft with key stakeholders and see if they agree. Developing and refining this roadmap will help you become more strategic and focused, while helping you develop your collective perspective and voice.

Its not easy to change the culture of how things are built. It’s hard but its important to start doing this.


6 things a Product Manager is not:

4. A product manager isn’t an agile fascist

Agile and lean are all-the-rage and de rigueur in modern software development. The next statement will probably be an unfashionable one but agile isn’t the only way to build web products and waterfall isn’t evil. Product managers shouldn’t be wedded to cult agile.

This made me chuckle. Good read.


First companies and now cities battling for top talent. Good times.


Prioritize health over work. It’s important.