Tight & Loose Cultures and its impact

From the Freakonomics Podcast episode – The U.S. is just different – so let’s stop pretending we’re not:

So, culture is about values, beliefs, absorbed ideas and behaviors. But here’s the thing about culture: it can be really hard to measure. Which is probably why we don’t hear all that much about the science of culture. When something is not easily measured, it often gets talked about in mushy or ideological terms. Michele Gelfand wasn’t interested in that. She did want to measure culture, and how it differs from place to place. She decided that the key difference, the right place to start measuring, was whether the culture in a given country is tight or loose.

I had no idea there was a who study dedicated to cross-cultural psychology. Having worked in both Tight & Loose cultures, I was able to relate to this podcast and the impact this has had on me and my work.

All cultures have social norms, these unwritten rules that guide our behavior on a daily basis. But some cultures strictly abide by their norms. They’re what we call tight cultures. And other cultures are more loose. They’re more permissive. 

You have to listen to the podcast to understand why a country or its culture is shaped the way it is. It’s not just entire countries, but even states within the US have tight or loose culture.

Michele Gelfand and several co-authors recently published a study in The Lancet about how Covid played out in loose versus tight cultures. Controlling for a variety of other factors, they found that looser countries — the U.S., Brazil, Italy, and Spain — have had roughly five times the number of Covid cases and nearly nine times as many deaths as tighter countries. But, let’s look at the pandemic from a different angle: which country produced the most effective Covid-19 vaccines? Tightness may create compliance; but looseness can drive innovation and creativity.

This blew me away.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Applying a ‘Time-To-Market’ KPI in product

Gabriel Dan on Mind the Product:

It’s a KPI—used mostly by the business—to measure the time required to move a product or service from conception to market (until it is available to be purchased). The process is the combined efforts of all stakeholders, product management, marketing, and so on. It includes workflow steps and strategies involved throughout the process. It’s usually calculated in days/weeks/months/years but it can be met in other forms too depending on how the different organizations will want to implement this.

This is simply amazing and important especially when you are constantly trying to beat your competition to get out in the market to capture your audience.

The shorter the time to market is, the quicker the return on investment (ROI) can be realized, therefore you can imagine why it’s important for businesses.

The quicker the product gets on the market, the bigger market share the company will get especially in an unaddressed segment facing less competition and thus enjoys better profit margins. Getting fresh and relevant products to market quickly attracts customers.

Exactly. It is very common to get into the phase of doing more before releasing to the market. The TTM metric forces you to be frugal about your MVP.

Gabriel Dan does a great job setting the premise and goes on the explain how the TTM should be calculated. Highly recommended.

Your Product is already obsolete – How to Survive

Des Traynor speaking at Mind the Product San Francisco Keynote:

All startups go through three distinct phases – birth, growth, and survival. You start by making the product work, then you have to grow the product, and then, crucially, you have to focus on survival – on keeping it relevant.

Relevant till date.
One of the best session I ever attended.