The 5G Airline Controversy: What is it about?

If you heard “5G”, “airlines” and “problem” and trying to figure out what is going on. You are not alone. James Fallows wrote a wonderful FAQ style article explaining what’s happening between the airlines and the wireless companies who operate 5G.

Short version: 5G versus the airlines is potentially a real issue, rather than a bogus threat. But it’s likely that the parties involved will work out adjustments soon. Which is a good thing.

Head over to the link to understand what exactly happened. I think the regulators have their hands full to read and probably re-write the rules.

Scaling with Process vs. People

Marty Cagan writing for SVPG on scaling your product with people instead of processes:

I loved reading this article particularly because he simply uses quotes from former CEO’s who have focused on people rather than processes to scale new heights for their product.

My favorite quote here is from Reid Hastings talking about Netflix:

“[The reason Netflix has been so successful is because it has] a culture that values people over process, emphasizes innovation over efficiency, and has very few controls. Our culture, which focuses on achieving top performance with talent density and leading employees with context not control, has allowed us to continually grow and change as the world, and our members’ needs, have likewise morphed around us.”

You need people to continue scaling your product which simply means creation of new software, hardware, service, etc

What’s in a Good Error Message?

I came across this great article by Gunnar Morling and have been wanting to repost this for a while… better late then never.

So what makes a good error message then? To me, it boils down to three pieces of information which should be conveyed by an error message:

Context: What led to the error? What was the code trying to do when it failed?
The error itself: What exactly failed?
Mitigation: What needs to be done in order to overcome the error?

The reason I find this article get is cause its coming from a Software Developer keeping other developers in context. I have worked as a Product Manager & a UX professional for several years now and Error messages is one of those areas which does not get much attention.

Its always at the back of your mind but other important aspects take over and error messages typically get overlooked.

Good error messages are important. When things go wrong, these error messages are the only communication channel between your software and customer. A good error message will allow your customer to recover well or submit a support ticket – and thats $ we are talking about.

The first comment by RossVertizan on this blog also has an important aspect for good error messages:

One thing that I would add is an indication of severity. Personally, I like to have every message preceded with a word which indicates the severity of the message

The secret of the macOS Monterey network quality tool

Dan Petrov found a cool new utility:

It seems that Apple has quietly added a new tool in macOS Monterey for measuring your device’s Internet connectivity quality. You can simply call the executable networkQuality, which executes the following tests:

– Upload/download capacity (your Tx/Rx bandwidth essentially)
– Upload/download flows, this seems to be the number of test packets used for the responsiveness tests
– Upload/download responsiveness measured in Roundtrips Per Minute (RPM), which according to Apple, is the number of sequential round-trips, or transactions, a network can do in one minute under normal working conditions

The capacity is roughly the same metric you could expect from tools like Fast.com from Netflix, or OOkla’s Speedtest.

Go to your terminal on your MacBook running macOS Monterey and type in networkQuality and hit enter and viola:

➜ ~ networkQuality
==== SUMMARY ====
Upload capacity: 1.136 Mbps
Download capacity: 204.729 Mbps
Upload flows: 16
Download flows: 12
Responsiveness: Medium (544 RPM)

Product vs Feature teams

Marty Cagan writing about Product vs Feature teams:

In an empowered product team, the product manager is explicitly responsible for ensuring value and viability; the designer is responsible for ensuring usability; and the tech lead is responsible for ensuring feasibility. The team does this by truly collaborating in an intense, give and take, in order to discover a solution that work for all of us.

When I talk and write about how tough it is to be a true product manager of an empowered product team, it’s precisely because it is so hard to ensure value and viability. If you think it’s easy to do this, please read this.

The lack of giving up control and delegating to your product team is probably the biggest reason I see very few product empowered teams.

Feature teams are set up similarly, but with a stark difference:

However, in a feature team, you still (hopefully) have a designer to ensure usability, and you have engineers to ensure feasibility, but, and this is critical to understand: the value and business viability are the responsibility of the stakeholder or executive that requested the feature on the roadmap.

If they say they need you to build feature x, then they believe feature x will deliver some amount of value, and they believe that feature x is something that is viable for the business.

Whichever way you see it; they both are squads but the differences run deep, but I’ll leave you with that I think is the most important

Let’s start with the role of the product manager. In an empowered product team, where the product manager needs to ensure value and viability, deep knowledge of the customer, the data, the industry and especially your business (sales, marketing, finance, support, legal, etc.) is absolutely non-negotiable and essential.

Yet in a feature team, that knowledge is (at best) dispersed among the stakeholders.

Controversial topic but an essential read.

Tight & Loose Cultures and its impact

From the Freakonomics Podcast episode – The U.S. is just different – so let’s stop pretending we’re not:

So, culture is about values, beliefs, absorbed ideas and behaviors. But here’s the thing about culture: it can be really hard to measure. Which is probably why we don’t hear all that much about the science of culture. When something is not easily measured, it often gets talked about in mushy or ideological terms. Michele Gelfand wasn’t interested in that. She did want to measure culture, and how it differs from place to place. She decided that the key difference, the right place to start measuring, was whether the culture in a given country is tight or loose.

I had no idea there was a who study dedicated to cross-cultural psychology. Having worked in both Tight & Loose cultures, I was able to relate to this podcast and the impact this has had on me and my work.

All cultures have social norms, these unwritten rules that guide our behavior on a daily basis. But some cultures strictly abide by their norms. They’re what we call tight cultures. And other cultures are more loose. They’re more permissive. 

You have to listen to the podcast to understand why a country or its culture is shaped the way it is. It’s not just entire countries, but even states within the US have tight or loose culture.

Michele Gelfand and several co-authors recently published a study in The Lancet about how Covid played out in loose versus tight cultures. Controlling for a variety of other factors, they found that looser countries — the U.S., Brazil, Italy, and Spain — have had roughly five times the number of Covid cases and nearly nine times as many deaths as tighter countries. But, let’s look at the pandemic from a different angle: which country produced the most effective Covid-19 vaccines? Tightness may create compliance; but looseness can drive innovation and creativity.

This blew me away.

Listen to the podcast or read the transcript.

Applying a ‘Time-To-Market’ KPI in product

Gabriel Dan on Mind the Product:

It’s a KPI—used mostly by the business—to measure the time required to move a product or service from conception to market (until it is available to be purchased). The process is the combined efforts of all stakeholders, product management, marketing, and so on. It includes workflow steps and strategies involved throughout the process. It’s usually calculated in days/weeks/months/years but it can be met in other forms too depending on how the different organizations will want to implement this.

This is simply amazing and important especially when you are constantly trying to beat your competition to get out in the market to capture your audience.

The shorter the time to market is, the quicker the return on investment (ROI) can be realized, therefore you can imagine why it’s important for businesses.

The quicker the product gets on the market, the bigger market share the company will get especially in an unaddressed segment facing less competition and thus enjoys better profit margins. Getting fresh and relevant products to market quickly attracts customers.

Exactly. It is very common to get into the phase of doing more before releasing to the market. The TTM metric forces you to be frugal about your MVP.

Gabriel Dan does a great job setting the premise and goes on the explain how the TTM should be calculated. Highly recommended.

Your Product is already obsolete – How to Survive

Des Traynor speaking at Mind the Product San Francisco Keynote:

All startups go through three distinct phases – birth, growth, and survival. You start by making the product work, then you have to grow the product, and then, crucially, you have to focus on survival – on keeping it relevant.

Relevant till date.
One of the best session I ever attended.